Zimbabwe leads in harnessing solar energy

05 Mar, 2021 - 00:03 0 Views
Zimbabwe leads in harnessing solar energy Solar panels at Sipepa Rural Hospital.

The Chronicle

Zimbabwe has struggled with crippling power outages, some of which (lasted) up to 18 hours a day.
The cuts (were) especially hard on the country’s hospitals and clinics, forcing nurses to deliver babies by candlelight and doctors to postpone emergency surgeries.

But all that has changed. Since 2017, Zimbabwe has installed solar panels atop more than 400 healthcare facilities, steadying power supplies and replacing expensive and polluting diesel-fired generators. The “Solar for Health” initiative is a prime example of the type of sustainable infrastructure development that will be vital to combating climate change, improving public services and driving the economic recovery from Covid-19.

So says a new report from the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). It urges planners and policymakers to take a more systematic approach to sustainable infrastructure, incorporating it into their long-term development plans and ensuring human-made systems work with natural ones.

“We can no longer use the business-as-usual approach to infrastructure, which is leading to ecological destruction and massive carbon dioxide emissions. Investments in sustainable infrastructure are not only environmentally sound but also bring economic and social benefits.

Low-carbon, nature-positive infrastructure projects can help minimise the sector’s environmental footprint and offer a more sustainable, cost-effective path to closing the infrastructure gap,” said Inger Andersen, Executive Director of UNEP.

A source of emissions
Built infrastructure, which includes everything from office blocks to highways to power plants, is responsible for 70 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions, mentions the report, the International Good Practice Principles for Sustainable Infrastructure.

Poorly designed, infrastructure can also displace communities, endanger wildlife and weigh, often for decades, on public finances.

“There is an urgent need to include sustainable and climate resilient infrastructure as an integral part of green growth to deliver energy, water, and transportation solutions that will facilitate opportunity, connection, and sustainable growth,” said Ban Ki-moon, former United Nations Secretary-General and the President of the Global Green Growth Institute, a UNEP partner.”

Ban said the new report is a “very useful guiding framework for governments to lay the groundwork for a future where sustainable infrastructure is the only kind of infrastructure we know.”

To help countries reach that goal, the new UNEP report offers guiding principles for governments to integrate sustainability into their decision making on infrastructure. Among other things, it recommends that states align their infrastructure planning with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, humanity’s blueprint for a better future. It also urges them to minimise the environmental footprint of construction projects and meaningfully engage local communities in infrastructure decision making.

We can no longer use the business-as-usual approach to infrastructure, which is leading to ecological destruction and massive carbon-dioxide emissions.

Return on investment
The report also highlighted the economic return on sustainable infrastructure, which includes renewable energy plants, eco-friendly public buildings and low-carbon transport. Investing in renewables and energy efficiency, it said, creates five times more jobs than investments in fossil fuels. Similarly, investing in resilient infrastructure in developing countries can create a return of US$4 for every US$1 invested, according to the World Bank.
Trendsetters

Alongside the report, UNEP released a series of case studies that showed how many countries are finding innovative ways to develop sustainable infrastructure.

In Ecuador, the government has turned to nature-based solutions to bolster water supplies to several major cities. By replanting trees, fencing off rivers and purchasing land for conservation, one region has revived watersheds that support more than 400 000 people.

In Singapore, which is aiming to have 80 percent of its buildings certified as green by 2030, builders have used recycled materials to construct everything from schools to corporate offices. (The country was the first to unveil a building constructed entirely of recycled concrete aggregate and demolition waste.)

With Covid-19 sparking a global wave of stimulus spending, Ambroise Fayolle, Vice President of the European Investment Bank said the publication of the principles “is timely, reminding us all of the importance of building back better by tackling the long-term challenges we face.”

The ‘International Good Practice Principles for Sustainable Infrastructure’ report and case studies are the latest in a series of publications from the United Nations Environment Programme that offer solutions to environmental challenges related to the three planetary crises of pollution, climate change and biodiversity loss.

Other studies include Integrated Approaches to Sustainable Infrastructure, the Emissions Gap Report 2020, the Adaptation Gap Report 2020, the Making Peace with Nature Report and the Global Status of Buildings Reports. — UNEP.

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